Harvest | The Right Way

By Aaron M.
Harvesting is a cannabis cultivation ritual. It’s a ceremony. Reaping what’s been sown is an act that’s been revered since the beginning of agriculture. So, you’re not just going to go in and hack down your precious plants without giving thanks, are you?

You invested every ounce of your being into cultivating an amazing cannabis crop. You’ve been pruning, training, feeding, and watching your girls grow tall and strong. The trichomes are milky, the colas are dank, and finally, the time has come.

This article is going to show you the right way to harvest. From the cut down to the drying and curing, this is, in my opinion, the right way to do it.

Preparation to harvest cannabis

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Take time to make sure you have all the tools you need ready to go. That means pruners, clippers, buckets and bins, hanging racks, and a team of close friends.

Decide beforehand how you’re going to harvest. Are you going to cut branches and hangers, at the base of the stalk, or pull the whole plant out of the ground? Each method will have its pros and cons here, but as long as your tools are sharp you should be good.

Try to harvest your plants earlier in the morning. They will be fresher, tastier, and more potent.

Cannabis Ceremony

It’s a time of joy and celebration! Give respect and thanks to the plant life you are about to take. Reminisce about the good times you’ve had together.

Say a few words, hold a moment of silence, just do something to express gratitude and respect for your plants.

I guarantee that the flowers are going to be much tastier.

Taking your cannabis plant from garden to dry room

Try to get your buds from the garden to the dry room as quick as possible. If you’re big leafing, set up a system. Your team needs to communicate and stay balanced.

You’ll need someone on harvest, someone on big leafing, and another person hanging. These tips are for larger crops, but you can scale these ideas down to your project too.

If you’re working alone, plan ahead. Make sure you’re not sitting in a room full of fresh cut ganja for a week trying to get the job done. Make sure to make a plan that is manageable and stick to it.

Drying Cannabis

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Your dry room should be dark. That’s because once cannabis is harvested, a light will degrade its terpene and cannabinoid content. Your room should also be kept at a reasonable temperature between 65 and 75 degrees Fahrenheit.

Make sure that the room has plenty of fresh air circulating, but don’t put fans blowing right on your plants. As your flowers dry they’re going to be releasing lots of water vapor into the air. This can lead to humidity build up in your room.

You may need to take extras measures and get a dehumidifier running to keep the moisture levels down. If not, your buds could easily grow mold. Yeah. You don’t want that.

Is the cannabis plant ready?

The pros know that quality cannabis takes time. Be patient. Most newbie harvesters will take their cannabis down too early, or smoke it before it’s fully cured.

The quality of flavor, aroma, and burn that comes from your flowers is crafted in the curing process. So, 6-10 days of hanging should be enough dry time. The stems should pop and not bend, and the flowers should be crispy on the outside.

Take your buds off the hanging racks, cut them from the stems and place them into an airtight container, preferably glass.

Open the container every day for a few minutes and move the buds around gently. After a few days, your flowers will be ready.

Conclusion

Cannabis plants are living, sentient beings that produce incredibly potent medicinal compounds. Give thanks every moment you spend on your growing plants.

Show love all the way to the final step of testing your harvest. Give thanks for a bountiful harvest and hope the next one will be just as nice, if not better.

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About the author: Aaron M.

Aaron is a freelance cannabis writer for Slyng, covering medical marijuana, cultivation and other cannabis culture topics. He's also an independent musician and songwriter releasing his debut album one single at a time.

www.aaronmatthewmusic.org