Does Recreational Marijuana stand a chance against Trump?

The recreational marijuana movement began more than 20 years ago when California voted overwhelmingly to pass Proposition 215, which legalized marijuana for medicinal use. Since the passing of Proposition 215 there have been 27 other states and the District of Columbia have passed laws legalizing marijuana for medicinal use.

 

A report released in January by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine found that there is conclusive and substantial evidence that cannabis is effective for the treatment of chronic pain in adults, including nausea from chemotherapy and multiple sclerosis-related spasms. Even with these scientific studies and cannabis research that is taking place around the world cannabis remains illegal under federal laws.

 

“States, they can pass the laws they choose. I would just say, it does remain a violation of federal law to distribute marijuana throughout any place in the United States, whether a state legalizes it or not,” Sessions told reporters. The federal government is well aware of the benefits of medicinal marijuana and the benefits of raking in the tax dollars from medicinal marijuana, so it is unknown why they would be so combative.

 

Trump wasn’t asked about medical marijuana during his campaign trail but when we was asked his response was “I think it’s up to the states, I’m a states person. I think it should be up to the states, absolutely.” Pretty vague answer, which is why there isn’t much certainty in the medical marijuana industry at the moment.

 

With the future of an entire industry still in peril there are still lawmakers in 17 states that have introduced more than two dozen measures to legalize recreational cannabis for adults and tax its sales. “Our focus is on revenue and bringing in cash to the state as legalization becomes more and more widespread,” Mary Washington, a state delegate from Maryland who introduced a bill recently that would tax marijuana like alcohol, told The Times. “Why not get it done now? We’re elected to do a job. More and more states are moving in this direction.”